PRESS RELEASE
University of Michigan
Armenian Studies Program
1080 S. University
Ste., 2603 SSWB
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1106
Tel: (734) 763-0622
Fax: (734) 763-4918
Gloria Caudill - Administrator


Contact: Gloria Caudill, administrator
[email protected]


SCHOLAR OF LATE OTTOMAN PERIOD TO JOIN ARMENIAN STUDIES AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN DURING WINTER SEMESTER

The Swiss scholar Hans-Lukas Kieser, a historian specializing in the
late Ottoman period, has been designated the first Manoogian Simone
Foundation Visiting Scholar, announced Prof. Gerard Libaridian,
Director of the Armenian Studies Program at the University of
Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Dr. Kieser, on the faculty of the University of Zurich, will be
joining the History Department faculty at the University of Michigan
for the Winter semester of the current academic year.  He will be
teaching two mini courses " 'Missionary" America and the Near East
(19th-20th century)" and "Turkish and Kurdish Nationalisms, Late 19th
and 20th Centuries."

Professor Kieser is the author of "A Quest for Belonging. Anatolia
beyond Empire and Nation (19th-21st centuries)," to be released soon,
as well as three other volumes and numerous articles dealing with
Anatolia, Turkish-Armenian relations and Western-Ottoman relations. He
has lectured widely and conducted many workshops throughout
Europe. Dr. Kieser is considered one of the most respected scholars
whose research focuses on this difficult period. Dr. Kieser's doctoral
dissertation (University of Basel, in German) was titled "Mission,
Ethnos and State in the Eastern Ottoman Provinces (1839-1923)."

The position of Visiting Scholar has been made possible by the recent
gift from the Manoogian Simone Foundation. In addition to teaching two
courses, Professor Kieser will also be delivering a number of lectures
to the University and larger communities during his stay from January
through April 2008.

"Professor Kieser is one of the most prolific and prominent scholars
who study the late Ottoman period," stated Prof. Libaridian. "His
contributions to the understanding of this important period have been
quite significant, especially in terms of his research into the
relations of the Ottoman state with non-Turkic peoples. His courses
will add a new dimension not only to the Armenian studies curriculum
but also to the already rich offerings of the departments of History
and Near Eastern Studies at our university. We are all delighted that
he has accepted our invitation."