NEW NANOSTRUCTURES STUDY FINDINGS HAVE BEEN REPORTED FROM YEREVAN STATE UNIVERSITY

Nanotechnology Business Journal
May 17, 2010

According to a study from Yerevan, Armenia, "We consider the
effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the binding
energy and photoionization cross section of hydrogen-like impurity in
Poschl-Teller quantum well. The ground state energy and the impurity
wave function are calculated using the variational method."

"The binding energy dependencies on the width of the quantum well,
the hydrostatic pressure, the impurity position and the temperature
are reported. The dependencies of the photoionization cross section on
incident photon energy for two different polarizations of the light,
different values of hydrostatic pressure and temperature have been also
considered. The results show that the binding energy is an increasing
(decreasing) function of the hydrostatic pressure (temperature) and
that the binding energy can increase or decrease depending not only
on the values of the confining potential parameters, but also on the
impurity position. In the case of the photoionization cross section,
the results show that by changing the polarization of the light, the
behavior of the photoionization cross section dependence on photon
energy changes dramatically," wrote M.G.

Barseghyan and colleagues, Yerevan State University.

The researchers concluded: "Associated with the increasing (decreasing)
of the binding energy with the hydrostatic pressure (temperature)
there is a redshift (blueshift) of the photoionization cross section
as a function of the energy of the incident photon."

Barseghyan and colleagues published the results of their research in
Physica E - Low - Dimensional Systems & Nanostructures (Simultaneous
effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on donor binding
energy and photoionization cross section in Poschl-Teller quantum
well. Physica E - Low - Dimensional Systems & Nanostructures,
2010;42(5):1618-1622).

For additional information, contact M.G. Barseghyan, Yerevan State
University, Dept. of Solid State Physics, Al Manookian 1, Yerevan
0025, Armenia.